Sea Level Rise to Cost US Ports Trillions By 2070 – Study

The Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development has released a study that assesses the cost of sea level rise damage to port cities around the world, reports Alex Kasdin at Climate Central. Miami was found to be the one that would be damaged most, at cost of about $3.5 trillion by 2070, and threatening nearly 5 million Americans. Of the ten most threatened ports, New York City and Newark, NJ shared third place, with just over $2 trillion in likely combined losses, and nearly 3 million people at risk by 2070; the rest were Asian ports. Study authors based their calculations on the risk of a hundred- year coastal flood, which is generally caused by storm surges, and will happen more often with rising seas. Currently, the report found that about 40 million port city people, and $3 trillion of property, are already susceptible to these devastating floods. By 2070, it adds, the combined effects of population growth, migration to cities, and rising seas will boost those numbers to 120 million people and $35 trillion. The conclusion?  The world could save a lot by implementing climate change policies instead.

Source

Trillions at stake in sea level rise for 20 global port cities. It’s easy enough to appreciate that sea level rise brought on by climate change poses a hazard to people and property. It’s not so easy, however, to predict exactly how many people are likely to be affected, and how much damage the rising seas are likely to do. Climate Central http://www.climatecentral.org/blogs/trillions-at-stake-in-sea-level-rise-for-worlds-top-20-port-cities/

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About melharte

Mel (Mary Ellen) Harte is a biologist (PhD) and climate change educator. She co-authored the free online book, COOL THE EARTH, SAVE THE ECONOMY, available at www.CoolTheEarth.US, and writes the CLIMATE CHANGE THIS WEEK column at the HuffingtonPost. Living summers in the alpine Rockies, she is on the frontlines of watching what climate change can do. Her diagnostic digital photographs of wildflowers have appeared in numerous publications.
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