Getting Into Hot Water to Save Energy

About 350 billion kilowatt hours of wastewater energy are flushed down drains annually, says the US Department of Energy. King County in Washington State hopes to harness that wasted heat and use it in buildings, reports Ashley Ahearn at Living On Earth.  From showers to dishwashing flows a supply of 65-degree Fahrenheit wastewater through miles of pipes. The county is making these pipes accessible to developers as a heat source for new buildings. Just like a refrigerator that moves heat away from food, heat pumps can be installed that basically move the heat from pipes to buildings. The International WasteWater Heat Exchange Systems does just that. The savings can be huge.  The company lowered the energy consumption of one Vancouver building by 75 percent, for example. Operating at 600 percent efficiency, the company reaps 6 dollars worth of energy for every dollar spent to recover wastewater energy.  Company sales are projected to jump from three million currently to 50 million next year. The key is to get developers of new buildings to incorporate this technology early in the design process, in order to reap big energy savings later.

If you’d like to tell Congress that you’re voting for candidates that will support clean energy, join the increasing numbers of people doing hereThen post it far and wide!

Source

Wastewater to energy. About 350 billion kilowatt hours of energy are flushed down drains in the form of warm wastewater every year, says the US Department of Energy. And one county in Washington State hopes to be among the first in the nation to try to harness that wasted heat and use it in buildings. Living On Earth

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About melharte

Mel (Mary Ellen) Harte is a biologist (PhD) and climate change educator. She co-authored the free online book, COOL THE EARTH, SAVE THE ECONOMY, available at www.CoolTheEarth.US, and writes the CLIMATE CHANGE THIS WEEK column at the HuffingtonPost. Living summers in the alpine Rockies, she is on the frontlines of watching what climate change can do. Her diagnostic digital photographs of wildflowers have appeared in numerous publications.
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One Response to Getting Into Hot Water to Save Energy

  1. Great article Mel. We support clean energy as well!

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