New Applications Make Geothermal Energy Rock

Geothermal is a great technology because it’s cheap and extremely energy dense, meaning it produces a large amount of valuable energy in a small amount of space, reports Chris Williams at Climate Progress. The largest US geothermal heat pump project under construction, for example, will be large enough to heat and cool 47 buildings at Ball State University in Indiana, replacing four old, dirty coal-fired boilers, while it helps create 2,300 construction related jobs.The 35 megawatt project will cost $60 million dollars, beating the cost of already cheap utility-scale solar projects. An equivalent solar installation would take up 140 acres of real estate, while this project is being installed under parking lots and sports fields, another great advantage. Other US geothermal projects include a community-wide geothermal heat pump in Provincetown, Massachussetts, allowing homeowners to save up to $2000 yearly in fossil fuel heating costs.  A Missouri university geothermal power project under construction will cut their energy costs about 50% while heating or cooling over 2 million square feet, cut their yearly water consumption by 8 million gallons. With savings like this, more are warming up to geothermal energy.

Join the swelling numbers of voters TELLING Congress they’ll vote for Clean Energy candidates here: http://signon.org/sign/we-are-the-clean-99?source=c.em.cp&r_by=487176 . This is an ongoing campaign (the next Congressional election is in 2 years!) so please, spread the word. This is how YOU can make a difference.

Source

Innovative Heating And Cooling Projects Prove The Benefits Of Geothermal  http://thinkprogress.org/climate/2012/11/21/1207011/innovative-heating-and-cooling-projects-prove-the-benefits-of-geothermal/ Chris Williams. Video on the

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About melharte

Mel (Mary Ellen) Harte is a biologist (PhD) and climate change educator. She co-authored the free online book, COOL THE EARTH, SAVE THE ECONOMY, available at www.CoolTheEarth.US, and writes the CLIMATE CHANGE THIS WEEK column at the HuffingtonPost. Living summers in the alpine Rockies, she is on the frontlines of watching what climate change can do. Her diagnostic digital photographs of wildflowers have appeared in numerous publications.
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