Climate Change Death Toll Mostly in 10 Developing Countries

Global climate change and pollution from using fossil fuels killed nearly 5 million people around the world in 2010, according to a report released earlier this year by climate change advocacy group DARA. By 2030, this figure will rise to nearly 6 million deaths, the group’s second annual climate vulnerability monitor estimates. Total global costs, which were estimated at more than $600 billion in 2010, are expected to rise to over $4 trillion by 2030. Of the nearly 5 million people who died in 2010 as a result of pollution and climate change, about three and a half million were located in just 10 countries. These nations are primarily highly populated developing African and Asian countries, which also are seeing a serious impact on their gross domestic product as the result of climate change. The deadliest nations are China and India, where climate and carbon emissions cause the most deaths. Other nations include Nigeria, Pakistan, Indonesia, the Congo Democratic Republic, Bangladesh, Ethiopia, Russia, and Afghanistan.

Join the swelling numbers of voters TELLING Congress they’ll vote for Clean Energy candidates here: http://signon.org/sign/we-are-the-clean-99?source=c.em.cp&r_by=487176 . This is an ongoing campaign (the next Congressional election is in 2 years!) so please, spread the word. This is how YOU can make a difference.

Source:

Ten places climate change kills the most people. Global climate change and pollution from the use of fossil fuels killed nearly five million people around the world in 2010, according to a new report. Of those, 3.49 million were located in just 10 countries. MarketWatch http://www.marketwatch.com/story/10-places-climate-change-kills-the-most-people-2012-12-18

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About melharte

Mel (Mary Ellen) Harte is a biologist (PhD) and climate change educator. She co-authored the free online book, COOL THE EARTH, SAVE THE ECONOMY, available at www.CoolTheEarth.US, and writes the CLIMATE CHANGE THIS WEEK column at the HuffingtonPost. Living summers in the alpine Rockies, she is on the frontlines of watching what climate change can do. Her diagnostic digital photographs of wildflowers have appeared in numerous publications.
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